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Visualisation

Searching for Somethings: A Return to the Lake District

For some time now I’ve been itching to get my head back into my own research, but between working in the 3DVisLab most of the week and freelance on client-led projects the rest it can be tricky finding the space to think in depth about anything other than the task in hand. To be fair, that ‘task in hand’ is mostly fun, interesting and challenging! However, for much of the week my brain is too saturated to think critically, let alone write about it.

Reflections on Celts

“Reflections on Celts is a partnership tour between National Museums Scotland and the British Museum featuring two Iron Age mirrors, which tell very different stories, and help us to understand the relationships between communities in Britain 2,000 years ago.“ – McManus Galleries, Dundee Very excited to share our film “Above the Law: Dundee Law in the Iron Age” which Kieran and I made for the Reflections on Celts exhibition at the McManus Galleries in Dundee.

Introducing the “Award Winning” Kieran Baxter

Last week Kieran and I travelled down to London to attend the AHRC Research in Film Awards which was hosted at the BAFTA Theatre in Piccadilly where Kieran’s Caterthuns film won in the Doctoral Award category. A still from Kieran’s film for which I modelled the Iron Age reconstructions for White Caterthun. It was brilliant to see Kieran win his category, especially since the Caterthuns were up against some stunning competition.

A Foray into 3D Printing

Now and again a project comes up that challenges me to explore a new technique or technology for the first time. One such job came across my desk recently which I thought was certainly worth a wee blog post. Earlier this summer I completed work preparing a number of Egyptian canopic jars from Luxor to be 3D printed. An example of one of the fragmentary canopic jars (NKRF). Yet to be printed, but a beautiful example of one of the jar lids (NKRF).

Call for papers

And another CAA is approaching! Deadline for paper abstracts: 28th of October ———————————————————————— The next International conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA 2017 – http://caaconference.org/) will be held between March 14th and 16th, 2017 at Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA, USA.

Mining the Movement: Some DH perspectives on student activism

This is the first of a series of blog post applying text mining and other DH techniques to the evolving student protest movement demanding racial equality. What can DH techniques tell use about student demands and administration responses? Are faculty and students talking to each other or at each other? This project is a collaborative effort between Mark Ravina, a professor of history at Emory University, and TJ Greer, a soon-to-be Emory College graduate and history major.

Mining the Movement: some DH perspectives on student activism

This is the first of a series of blog post applying text mining and other DH techniques to the evolving student protest movement demanding racial equality. What can DH techniques tell use about student demands and administration responses? Are faculty and students talking to each other or at each other? This project is a collaborative effort between Mark Ravina, a professor of history at Emory University, and TJ Greer, a recent Emory College graduate and history major.

Leiston Abbey: Digging and Drones with Dig Ventures

Really excited to share a film Baxter and I have been working on over the course of the past year with Dig Ventures and English Heritage. Brendon at Dig Ventures approached us last year with a challenge, should we choose to accept it – using drone footage captured by Adam Stanford (Aerial Cam) and an earlier reconstruction by Drew Smith we were tasked with telling the story of Leiston Abbey and the Dig Ventures excavations.

Broadlands Farm: Gaming and an Interactive Archive

Right guys – it’s official, after a wee hiatus this year (have been unbelievably busy, all exciting stuff of course) I’m returning to blogging with full force! As most of you know, in the year or so since I finished my PhD I’ve set myself up to operate freelance and have been working on a wide range of projects, mostly in a commercial capacity though there’s still a fair few research-based ones thrown in there for good measure.

Learning to Engage with Digital Visualisations

A wee post about one of the current research projects I’ve got on the go with Tessa and the Glasgow SERF team! Designing Digital Engagements The SERF project has been investigating hillforts in Strathearn, Perthshire since 2007.  We have now explored eleven sites and have dug trenches across their surviving ramparts and ditches.

Smooth and Rough on the Highways of France

In a previous post I suggested that historians should use quantitative methods less to answer existing questions than to pose new ones. Such a digital humanities (DH) approach would be the reverse of the older social science history approach, in which social science tools were use to “answer” definitively longstanding questions.

Smooth and Rough on the Highways of France

In a previous post I suggested that historians should use quantitative methods less to answer existing questions than to pose new ones. Such a digital humanities (DH) approach would be the reverse of the older social science history approach, in which social science tools were use to “answer” definitively longstanding questions.

Astroarchaeology Shoot

  In June of 2015, xRez set out to shoot alignments of the summer solstice occurring with known Anasazi ruins in conjunction with researchers from the University of Colorado in Boulder. Known as “Astroarchaeology”, the field studies the relation of built structures to celestial patterns, with many of our graphics techniques well positioned to help visualize and decipher such phenomena.

Björk Black Lake Digital Terrain

xRez Studio had the great pleasure of providing digital terrain capture for Björk’s recent special venue film “Black Lake”, featured at MoMA NYC in her retrospective exhibition in spring 2015 and directed by the gifted designer and director Andrew Thomas Huang . The effort consisted of capturing several locations shot for the film, including a dark, narrow lava tube cave, a volcanic ravine, an open moss-covered plain, and various set pieces on stage.

Open Archaeology Journal – New Paper

In between jetting off to Sweden, New Zealand and the USA (hope to get permissions to write a post about what I was up to soon…) over the past month or two I published a paper in the De Gruyter Open Archaeology journal. The journal is open access which is great because it’s peer reviewed and freely available to everyone online which I think is really important for academic work.