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Stonehenge Tunnel Scheme: Consultation now open

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Stonehenge and the A303 Plans for the upgrading of the A303, including a tunnel past Stonehenge, have now been published with a fanfare and there is a consultation phase open until 5th March.

tDAR is now part of DataONE

Digital Antiquity is proud to announce that tDAR is now a formal member node of the Data Observation Network for Earth (DataONE). DataONE enables universal access to data and also facilitates researchers in fulfilling their need for data management and in providing secure and permanent access to their data. DataONE offers the scientific community a suite of tools and training materials that cover all aspects of the data life cycle from data collection, to management, analysis and publication.

The limits of the Roman limes

Roman studies are all over network science! In particular the team behind the ‘Finding the limits of the Limes’ project at the VU Amsterdam. They’ve been doing some really cool network analyses of Roman socio-economic and transport networks. Next month they will be hosting a major conference.

Workshop in Ottawa tomorrow

Iza Romanowska and I have spent the last few weeks at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, doing some awesome Roman networky boardgame “research” with Shawn Graham. You’ll hear more about this cool work soon. Tomorrow we will give a workshop on simulation and networks for the humanities.

Linked Pasts II: Madrid, 15-16 December 2016

This event will be of interest to those reading this blog. Pelagios Commons is pleased to announce the second international “Linked Pasts”, a symposium dedicated to facilitating practical and pragmatic developments in linking digital resources in History, Classics, Geography and Archaeology.

The Ethics of Dust: Westminster Hall

Last year Archaeovision were contacted by Artangel in regard to their Ethics of Dust project. The Ethics of Dust is a major temporary site-specific artwork of Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the Houses of Parliament, home of the UK’s House of Commons and House of Lords. A 50 metre long translucent latex cast of the hall’s internal and external east wall were recorded, containing hundreds of years of surface pollution and dust.

Network analysis at CAA NL-FL-DE in Ghent

It’s not often that I get to see network analysis as one of the themes in an archaeological conference! So I’m delighted to see it feature so prominently at this year’s joint meeting of the CAA Netherlands/Flanders and Germany joint meeting. I presented at the conference last year and can definitely recommend it.

New online tours of Portus launched

We are pleased to launch a series of online tours produced by Peter Wheeler. Peter, with input from the rest of the Portus Project team, has created tours for the Claudian, Trajanic, and Severan periods, and for the Fifth to Seventh Centuries. There is also a tour providing a virtual visit to the archaeological site as it is today. Finally there is an interactive timeline for the site. The tours are intended only as a first step and we have many additions and modifications planned.