Currently browsing tag

3d

Introduction to 3D GIS and BIM 2017

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Flux Seed by Steve Jurvetson Kelvin Wong of UCL is organising an Introduction to 3D GIS and BIM. This free event promises to be a great introduction to the subject and as of today (09/01/2017) there are only three places remaining so book pronto! The day will be split into two parts.

Curso de Tecnologías Computacionales Aplicadas a Arqueología

In collaboration with the University of Chester and the Past in its Place Project, we are giving the first Course on Computational Technologies Applied to Archaeology at the National School of Anthropology and History in Mexico, taking place 5-9 of October. The course include topics such as GIS and Spatial Analysis, 3D modelling, Reflectance Transformation Imaging and Photogrammetry.

Working out the kinks in a VisualSFM via Docker workflow

Not these kinks. VSFM, for those who’ve tried it, is a right huge pain in the arse to install. Ryan Bauman has done us all a huge favour by dockerizing it. His explanation of this is here – and once you’ve figured out some of the kinks, this is much easier way of working with it. Ah yes, the kinks. First of all, before we go any further, why would you want to do this? Isn’t 123D Catch enough? It is certainly easier, I grant you that. And it does a pretty good job.

CAA-UK 2015, University of Bradford

Here are the videos from CAAUK in March. A bit about the conference- CAA-UK aims to encourage communication between UK-based archaeologists, mathematicians and computer scientists in order to stimulate research and promote best practice in computational and mathematical approaches to the past. The conference was held at Bradford University’s dedicated Norcroft Conference Centre.

LiDAR, Local Relief Models and Sketchfab

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Cranbrook Castle; LiDAR based Digital Terrain Model (DTM) The following visualisations were produced as part of the Fingle Woods and Castle Drogo Aerial Survey Analysis and Interpretation project, recently completed for the National Trust.

historical maps into Unity3d

This should work. Say there’s a historical map that you want to digitize.  It may or may not have contour lines on it, but there is some indication of the topography (hatching or shading or what not). Say you wanted to digitize it such that a person could explore its conception of geography from a first person perspective. Here’s a workflow for making that happen. Some time ago, the folks at the NYPL put together a tutorial explaining how to turn such a map into a minecraft world.

The Monumental Collective

As many of you will know if you read the blog regularly, since the Digital Dwelling fieldwork I’ve continued to work on a number of collaborative projects and endeavors with Aaron Watson, Kieran Baxter and John Was. So I’m excited to share that in addition to my own projects I am now also working with Monumental, a creative heritage interpretation practice founded by Aaron Watson which also forms a front for our collaborative work.

Archaeovision

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Archaeovision In the wake of the first birthday celebrations, Archaeogeomancy are very pleased to announce a new venture: Paul Cripps is now a consultant for Archaeovision, a new company launched Q4 2013 specialising in 3D recording, imaging and web/data management for the heritage sector.

Mysteries of the Unseen World

xRez was contracted by Day’s End Pictures to shoot stereoscopic time-lapse sequences for the National Geographic IMAX production of “Mysteries of the Unseen World“.   Released in November of 2013, the film reveals the stunning beauty and enormity of the world that is in front of us but cannot be seen due to the scale, time period, or electromagnetic frequency. The film uses high-speed, time-lapse, electron microscopy, and nanotechnology to reveal this unseen world.

A Medieval Discovery at Gulval Church, Cornwall

Just to the left of the south porch of Gulval Church, near Penzance in Cornwall, lies a large block of granite. I first came across it on a visit to the churchyard in 2012. However, it really piqued my interest a couple of months ago after reading a short report in Newsletter 132 of the Cornwall Archaeological Society.

Linear B Archives Project in Full Swing

This post will be a brief introduction to an ongoing project, currently in field data collection.   As announced nearly a year ago, a small team, under the direction of Dimitri Nakassis (Toronto) and Kevin Pluta (Charleston), is involved with the documentation and publication of the palatial archives from the Palace of Nestor in Pylos, Greece.

p3d.in for hosting your 3d scans

I’m playing with p3d.in to host some three dimensional models I’ve been making with 123D Catch. These are models that I have been using in conjunction with Junaio to create augmented reality pop-up books (and other things; more on that anon). Putting these 3d objects onto a webpage (or heaven forbid, a pdf) has been strangely much more complicated and time-consuming. P3d.in then serves a very useful purpose then! Below are two models that I made using 123D catch.

Portus and ACRG work on BBC 1

Visualisation of Harbour produced by BBC for Rome’s Lost Empire in collaboration with Portus ProjectOn Sunday a show called Rome’s Lost Empire featured loads of great work by Southampton archaeologists. Since 2007 a team led by Prof. Simon Keay and Dr. Graeme Earl has been excavating at Portus, the port of the city of ancient Rome. The BBC 1 show reveals some of their latest findings, as well as the 3D modelling work of our Archaeological Computing Research Group team.

Photogrammetry from Kite Aerial Photography (KAP)

While working on the National Geographic Special “Sunken Treasures of the Nile” we were very interested in how we could represent the terrain of the surrounding area. Unfortunately there were no DEM (Digital Elevation Models) of this remote area and we were unable to charter an aircraft due to the designation of military air-space. The only method we had available to us for re-creating this kind of terrain was through the use of Kite Aerial Photography and Photogrammetry.