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Projects

Spring Update: Recording in Yorkshire

After a busy winter in the office we have been out in the field again working with Upper Wharfedale Heritage Group at St Mary’s Church in Embsay. We have been working with the group to share documentation skills but also to develop our project methodology which we will be getting online soon. This marks the start of a new phase for the Re-Reading the British Memorial Project.

Archaeological Blogging Questions

Fleur Schinning, a graduate student at Leiden University, is asking for responses to a questionnaire she has devised about your use of various archaeological blogs (including this one). It doesn’t take long so take a look here: http://goo.gl/forms/z3BAUTyYUL and you might even get six issues of Archaeology Magazine.

Open Context Upgrade Progress

Last summer, we launched a major programming effort to upgrade Open Context. The upgrade involves completely rewriting all of Open Context’s software so as to more efficiently scale Open Context and take advantage of technology standards that have emerged to prominence since our last major upgrade back in 2009-2011. We’ve now deployed the new version of Open Context on a testing / development server generously provided by the German Archaeological Institute (DAI).

3 reasons to visit the Open Context booth at the SAA meeting

At this year’s SAA meeting in San Francisco, Open Context will have it’s first-ever exhibit hall booth! Swing by booth #603 to say hello! If you need a reason to visit, here are three: “I have questions (or suggestions) about data publishing!” Many people have data they want share, but questions about how to go about it. We’re happy to talk about your data sharing concerns and help you understand what kind of time and effort will go into publishing your data.

Mobilizing the Past Workshop Videos

I can hardly describe how useful the Mobilizing the Past: The Potential of Digital Archaeology workshop was last weekend. The organizers: Erin Averett, Derek Counts, Jody Gordon, and Michael Toumazou built a solid schedule of talks with a very tight thematic focus. I don’t know when I learned more in a single weekend.

Mobilizing the Past

At the end of February  (27-28) I will be attending the Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future workshop at the Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. The workshop is organized by members of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus, where they have been using a “digital notebook” since 2012.

Registry of Research Data Repositories

The Registry of Research Data Repositories (re3data.org) is hosting a database of over 900 data repositories that cover “all academic disciplines.” The Registry is funded by the German Research Foundation and is comprised of all German institutes. However, to be included, the repository must have an English GUI to their website.

Upgrading Open Context

With summer wrapping up and a new fellowship about to begin, it’s time to share some updates about Open Context. Warning! Much of this post is pretty geeky. So if you don’t enjoy geeking out on the nitty-gritty of archaeological informatics issue, you’re welcome to move on to something else! I’m busy working with John Ward on completely rebuilding Open Context from scratch. Open Context is now over 7 years old, and has already gone through two significant revisions.

Zooarchaeology of Neolithic Anatolia: Research Outcomes from Large-Scale Data Integration with Open Context

We are happy to report the publication of a paper synthesizing several integrated datasets documenting zooarchaeological specimens from Neolithic Anatolia. The open access journal PLOS ONE published the paper on Friday. The paper presents results of a large-scale data sharing and integration study funded by a “Computable Data Challenge” award from the Encyclopedia of Life and by the National Endowment for the Humanities (see project description).

DINAA @ SAA

The DINAA project had a very successful reception at the 79th Annual Society for American Archaeology conference in Austin, TX last month. With several presentations spanning traditional conference papers, posters, and a lightning talk at the Digital Data Interest Group meeting, conference-goers were provided with no shortage of opportunities to learn about multiple aspects of the project and its implications for the future of archaeological research. Papers: David G.