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New online tours of Portus launched

We are pleased to launch a series of online tours produced by Peter Wheeler. Peter, with input from the rest of the Portus Project team, has created tours for the Claudian, Trajanic, and Severan periods, and for the Fifth to Seventh Centuries. There is also a tour providing a virtual visit to the archaeological site as it is today. Finally there is an interactive timeline for the site. The tours are intended only as a first step and we have many additions and modifications planned.

Planning Application assessments; automation using ArcPy

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: The Machine by halfrain Archaeogeomancy were pleased to be commissioned to build a system to automate an existing workflow for handling and reporting on geospatial information.

Stonehenge bypass back on the agenda. Or not.

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: The Stone Circle at Stonehenge; just one of the c. 700 sites which together form part of the landscape inscribed as a World Heritage Site I was dismayed to find the latest copy of the Valley News arrive through my letterbox featuring a front page article entitled Stones bypass back on the agenda.

Computational archaeology news – January 2016

Quite a few news have gathered since the last news post, here they are: New York Public Library Invites a Deep Digital Dive: Digital content and APIs to be made availably by the New York Public library. Archaeology From Above: Article explaining LIDAR for archaeology Estonia launches robot for underwater archaeology [Video]: Youtube video about U-cat robot Muons and drone-mounted lasers probe for secret rooms in Egypt’s pyramids: X-rays of the pyramids to be taken to find hidden chambers.

Slack group for the Digital Humanities

In a previous post I mentioned a Slack chat group for the Crafting Digital History course taking place from the 11th of January. Our lecturer has been quite active on the group and has shared numerous valuable resources already. One of these resources was the mention of the Digital Humanities Slack team where archaeologists, historians, curators, developers, and anyone else interested in digital humanities gets together virtually and shares a  plethora of information relevant to the field.

Crafting Digital History Course starting

A few blog posts ago I mentioned that Shawn Graham from the Electric Archaeology blog will be presenting a course  which is freely open to anyone. This course is called Crafting Digital History and it will commence on the 11th of January. There is an opportunity to gain official credits as well if you want, you can read more on that here. The course syllabus can be found here. The workbook can be found here. There is also a Slack chat team that you can join using this invite.

Computational Archaeology Lego

Yes, this post is as silly as it sounds, but it was necessary ^^. It was my birthday recently and my partner wrote me a story about a marine archaeologist using an ROV to discover a treasure. He played this out with little Lego pieces, including a Lego ROV. Here is a picture of this cute Lego ROV: And things got ridiculous.

GSTAR web services; now with added GeoJSON

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: “A boundary is an array of an array of an array of arrays” by Paul Downey Following on from the last update concerning the GSTAR web services, the final pieces of infrastructure for the case studies and demonstrator are nearly complete.

Computational Archaeology News and Articles – November 2015

There have been quite a few computational archaeology related articles lately. Here’s a list: Khaled al-Asaad, The Martyr Of Palmyra: Mentions the use of satellite images to confirm the destruction of the Temple of Bel Oldest Roman military fort: airborne lasers uncover fort from 178BC: LIDAR used to discover Roman forts. Mysterious Ancient Geoglyphs Discovered In Kazakhstan Leave Archeologists Perplexed: Geoglyphs discovered by archaeology enthusiasts using Google Earth. Search for Capt.

GSTAR at Salisbury Museum

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Beaker Pots by Wessex Archaeology The final batch of source data has now safely received and is being processed for inclusion in my GSTAR project, kindly provided by the good people at Salisbury Museum.

Dev Day presentation on Computational Archaeology

Software companies often have days where developers either present a topic of their choice or get together to create prototypes of their innovative ideas. Some of these events are held internally and others, by larger companies, internationally. Some examples of popular companies that do this are: Google: Holds an international developer day once a year focused on teaching participants about Google development tools. They also hold dev days specific for Android Developers.

Smooth and Rough on the Highways of France

In a previous post I suggested that historians should use quantitative methods less to answer existing questions than to pose new ones. Such a digital humanities (DH) approach would be the reverse of the older social science history approach, in which social science tools were use to “answer” definitively longstanding questions.

Smooth and Rough on the Highways of France

In a previous post I suggested that historians should use quantitative methods less to answer existing questions than to pose new ones. Such a digital humanities (DH) approach would be the reverse of the older social science history approach, in which social science tools were use to “answer” definitively longstanding questions.

Computational Archaeology news, software, tools and videos August 2015

It’s been a busy year, but that’s no reason to not sneak in a computational archaeology news and links post. Here are some of the latest articles I’ve ran into: News and articles Nazi-destroyed synagogue mapped by laser: Archaeologists use ground penetrating laser techniques to search for an fourth century synagogue. Another link on this: Ground-Penetrating Radar Maps Lithuania’s Great Synagogue.

Day of Archaeology 2015

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Dr. Henry Walton “Indiana” Jones, Jr. Yes, it’s that time of year again: Time for the annual Day of Archaeology. And once again, my day does not involve any temples in remote jungles, crystal skulls or raiding any tombs.