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Stonehenge Tunnel Scheme: Consultation now open

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Stonehenge and the A303 Plans for the upgrading of the A303, including a tunnel past Stonehenge, have now been published with a fanfare and there is a consultation phase open until 5th March.

Introduction to 3D GIS and BIM 2017

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Flux Seed by Steve Jurvetson Kelvin Wong of UCL is organising an Introduction to 3D GIS and BIM. This free event promises to be a great introduction to the subject and as of today (09/01/2017) there are only three places remaining so book pronto! The day will be split into two parts.

Digital Humanities communities in Berlin

Happy new year readers! I am glad to say that we have arrived in Berlin and are settling in. So far we have been exploring the areas around us and awing at the amazing architecture. The city has been fairly quiet (except for an incredibly large amount of fireworks on New Years), so we have mostly been walking around the streets. I have found a Digital Humanities group that that has certain events in Berlin.

Moving to Berlin!

I’ve been living in South Africa for the past 13 years. I did my high school, bachelors and post-graduate studies here. I’ve had a wonderful time during my stay in a country so full of beautiful scenery and archaeology, wrapped in the hearts of so many cultures. I’ve made some amazing friendships and memories. Now, it’s time for a new chapter in our life.

Johannesburg Meetup with guest speaker on microtomography

I am organising another computational archaeology meetup in Johannesburg on the 21st of November. This time the company that I work for (Entelect) is sponsoring a venue and pizza! This post aims at going a bit more in depth on the topics that will be discussed as well as on the guest speaker and how this meetup came to be. Let’s start with a short story first. We were on our way to Clarens for a weekend away with my sister in law and her partner.

Exploring museums with Google Maps

My husband was exploring Berlin through Google Maps Streetview. He came to show me that Streetview in Berlin allows you to explore inside quite a few shops. While we virtually walked around Berlin together we got to Museum Island, where most of the museums in Berlin are situated.

Call for papers

And another CAA is approaching! Deadline for paper abstracts: 28th of October ———————————————————————— The next International conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA 2017 – http://caaconference.org/) will be held between March 14th and 16th, 2017 at Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA, USA.

Computational Archaeology Documentaries

  I’m busy working through a bunch of documentaries when cooking. I found that the Archaeology section of Documentary Heaven is more focused on computational archaeology than I would have imagined. Here is the list that I have found so far: Documentary on the Vikings – discusses how satellite imaging is used to find Viking sites in locations never thought to have been reached by the Vikings.

Collaborative digital archaeology primer

Shawn Graham from the Electric Archaeology blog has created a Github project called DAP. This projects aims to gather people across the Computational Archaeology community to work on a digital archaeology primer. The aim of this primer is to gather basic information about computational archaeology from the community. This information can then be used to teach archaeologists about the use of technology in archaeology.

Progress for the Meetup in Johannesburg

The meetup is doing well! We now have 24 members of the Computational Archaeology Meetup group in Johannesburg, South Africa. Our first meeting will be at Wolves in Illovo on the 20th of July. It is aimed at getting to know each other, after which we’ll know more about each other’s skills and be able to organise some presentations/workshops. We have 8 guests that have confirmed the actual invitation so far, which can be found here: http://www.meetup.

Computational Archaeology Meetup in Johannesburg

Hello fellow digital humanities enthusiasts living in/near Johannesburg South Africa. I’ve decided to start a computational archaeology  meetup group. In this meetup I hope to encourage a larger interaction between digital humanities enthusiasts in South Africa. Depending on the interest we can either have a relaxed discussion or set up some presentations. Here is the link to the meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/Computational-Archaeology-Meetup/ .

3D modelling with a smart phone

Today I tried out the application called 123D Catch. This app allows you to capture images of an object and creates a 3D model from these. In other words, this is a photogrammetry app. To use the application you take images of the object that you want to model from a set of different angles by walking around the object. You then get a chance to review the photographs to remove any blurry images. Once reviewed you accept the images and these get uploaded to a server which creates the 3D model.

Computational Archaeology News – May 2016

Here are some of the articles I have read most recently relating to computational archaeology. Teenager Uses Star Map To Discover Lost Mayan City In Central America:Satellite imaging and star positioning were used by a student to discover a lost Mayan city. Thanks To Cosmic Rays, We Finally Know What The Inside Of A Pyramid Looks Like: Cosmic rays used to map the internal structures of Egypt’s pyramids.

Mining the Movement: Some DH perspectives on student activism

This is the first of a series of blog post applying text mining and other DH techniques to the evolving student protest movement demanding racial equality. What can DH techniques tell use about student demands and administration responses? Are faculty and students talking to each other or at each other? This project is a collaborative effort between Mark Ravina, a professor of history at Emory University, and TJ Greer, a soon-to-be Emory College graduate and history major.

Mining the Movement: some DH perspectives on student activism

This is the first of a series of blog post applying text mining and other DH techniques to the evolving student protest movement demanding racial equality. What can DH techniques tell use about student demands and administration responses? Are faculty and students talking to each other or at each other? This project is a collaborative effort between Mark Ravina, a professor of history at Emory University, and TJ Greer, a recent Emory College graduate and history major.

Experiences with the Crafting Digital History Course

Earlier this year I participated in a Digital History course as an open access participant. The course was run by Shawn Graham, otherwise known as the writer of the Electric Archaeology blog. Shawn was a great distance teacher, always available via the Slack group and always up for any form of discussion. Even though I was in a completely different time-zone Slack allowed us to communicate freely and as synchronously as possible.

3D modelling of My Son Unesco Site

We recently visited Vietnam for a holiday and had the chance to visit the My Son UNESCO Heritage site. This site consists of a group of Hindu temples constructed to worship the god Shiva and located in central Vietnam. My Son is a beautiful site that unfortunately also suffered partial destruction during the war. Today parts of My Son have been restored and 3D models of the various buildings have been created.

LiDAR Analysis Toolkit for ArcGIS

Archaeogeomancy: Digital Heritage Specialists - archaeological geomatics - the majick of spatial data in archaeology - archaeological information systems for the digital age: Local Relied Model of Old Sarum, Salisbury, WIlts. Based on Environment Agency LiDAR data. Produced using the LiDAR Analysis Toolkit. Archaeogeomancy were pleased to be commissioned to produce a self contained ArcGIS Toolkit for the analysis of LiDAR data.