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Open access, Page 3

By: Doug

Hi Henry Don’t feel bad, your were played by the best of them. Actually, that is a lie at best I am average. Ah who am I kidding I am like in the bottom 5%. You should feel bad.

By: Kelly M

A fellow rebel. Good on you, Henry! I knew Doug was up to no good. Procrastination seems to be a very common theme amongst us archaeo-bloggers. Perhaps there wouldn’t be anyone blogging if we all did what we’re supposed to do.

Recommendations on Ethics, Sustainability, and Open Access in Archaeology

In the article On Ethics, Sustainability, and Open Access in Archaeology available in the September 2013 issue of the SAA Archaeological Record, co-authors Eric Kansa, Sarah Whitcher Kansa, and Lynne Goldstein provide recommendations to the SAA for improving access to research results in archaeology. The authors welcome comments on the following five recommendations: Gain experience with Open Access. The SAA needs to better understand the opportunities and costs associated with Open Access.

Stonehenge Gallery – Images by Adam Stanford.

Stonehenge Friday In the second of a series of themed image galleries, we’re proud to present a small selection from Adam Stanford‘s huge and unique Stonehenge image collection. Please note that these are for...The post Stonehenge Gallery – Images by Adam Stanford. appeared first on Digital Digging.

The Houses on Dorstone Hill.

The discovery of two Early Neolithic houses on Dorstone Hill, Herefordshire, rightly caught the attention of a large number of news outlets (both digital and deadwood) earlier this week – Adam Stanford of Aerial-Cam...The post The Houses on Dorstone Hill. appeared first on Digital Digging.

Hunting, Gathering, Cheesemaking.

Adventures on the road to lactose tolerance. In the 1970s, archaeologist Peter Bogucki was excavating a Stone Age site in the fertile plains of central Poland when he came across an assortment of odd...The post Hunting, Gathering, Cheesemaking. appeared first on Digital Digging.

New rock art discovered at the Ness of Brodgar dig.

Ness of Brodgar 2013 Sigurd Towrie’s Orkney Jar website is carrying some early images of some rather impressive rock art discovered inside Structure Ten during this year’s excavations at the Ness of Brodgar Neolithic...The post New rock art discovered at the Ness of Brodgar dig. appeared first on Digital Digging.

DINAA Project at Digital Humanities 2013: Open Context and North American Site Files

While Sarah and Eric Kansa are busy finishing up field work and “data wrangling” at Poggio Civitate, our colleagues and collaborators will discuss the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA) project at the 2013 Digital Humanities Conference. Josh Wells (PI) will take part in a session Current Research & Practice in Digital Archaeology (organized by Ethan Watrall) to give an overview of DINAA and our progress thus far.

Social Divisions – Google Plus or Facebook?

Two Tribes. Or three or more. One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s something of a social leveller – you don’t have to be connected to a person to initiate communication, or indeed jump into a conversation. Lots of potentially exciting ideas are generated this way, but …The post Social Divisions – Google Plus or Facebook? appeared first on Digital Digging - Blog.

Comments on OSTP Open Data Policy

Today, Open Context’s Eric Kansa spoke (via phone) at the meeting on Public Access to Federally-Supported Research and Development Data and Publications: Data, hosted by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The meeting, taking place May 16-17, is hearing invited and public comments on the White House OSTP memo on expanding access to data resulting from federally-funded research, with the aim of informing agencies as they develop policies in response to the memo.

Lessons in Data Reuse, Integration, and Publication

On April 17, members of the Central and Western Anatolian Neolithic Working Group met at Kiel University to participate in the International Open Workshop: Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes III. Working group participants presented their hot-off-the-press analyses of various aspects of integrated faunal datasets from over one dozen Anatolian archaeological sites spanning the Epipaleolithic through the Chalcolithic (a range of 10,000+ years).

Time for a new Stonehenge?

News has emerged that the new Stonehenge visitor centre will contain a 360 cinema so that visitors to the site can experience what it feels like to stand inside the stone circle. How about...The post Time for a new Stonehenge? appeared first on Digital Digging.

The Digital Hillfort Mapping Project

The Digital Hillfort Mapping Project (at digitaldigging.net) has its roots in late 2008, when I was compiling pages for the first iteration of Digital Digging. Updates to the Google Earth and Maps tile-sets were revealing large...The post The Digital Hillfort Mapping Project appeared first on Digital Digging.

New data publications in Open Context highlight early globalization

What does a fragment of a Canton blue and white porcelain plate from the early 19th century in Alaska have in common with a stone jar from the mid-18th century Northern Mariana Islands? Give up? Both were published in Open Context this week! The two projects these objects come from also share a common theme— documenting early globalization in the greater (much greater!) Pacific region.