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Spring Update: Recording in Yorkshire

After a busy winter in the office we have been out in the field again working with Upper Wharfedale Heritage Group at St Mary’s Church in Embsay. We have been working with the group to share documentation skills but also to develop our project methodology which we will be getting online soon. This marks the start of a new phase for the Re-Reading the British Memorial Project.

Open Context Upgrade Progress

Last summer, we launched a major programming effort to upgrade Open Context. The upgrade involves completely rewriting all of Open Context’s software so as to more efficiently scale Open Context and take advantage of technology standards that have emerged to prominence since our last major upgrade back in 2009-2011. We’ve now deployed the new version of Open Context on a testing / development server generously provided by the German Archaeological Institute (DAI).

3 reasons to visit the Open Context booth at the SAA meeting

At this year’s SAA meeting in San Francisco, Open Context will have it’s first-ever exhibit hall booth! Swing by booth #603 to say hello! If you need a reason to visit, here are three: “I have questions (or suggestions) about data publishing!” Many people have data they want share, but questions about how to go about it. We’re happy to talk about your data sharing concerns and help you understand what kind of time and effort will go into publishing your data.

Upgrading Open Context

With summer wrapping up and a new fellowship about to begin, it’s time to share some updates about Open Context. Warning! Much of this post is pretty geeky. So if you don’t enjoy geeking out on the nitty-gritty of archaeological informatics issue, you’re welcome to move on to something else! I’m busy working with John Ward on completely rebuilding Open Context from scratch. Open Context is now over 7 years old, and has already gone through two significant revisions.

Zooarchaeology of Neolithic Anatolia: Research Outcomes from Large-Scale Data Integration with Open Context

We are happy to report the publication of a paper synthesizing several integrated datasets documenting zooarchaeological specimens from Neolithic Anatolia. The open access journal PLOS ONE published the paper on Friday. The paper presents results of a large-scale data sharing and integration study funded by a “Computable Data Challenge” award from the Encyclopedia of Life and by the National Endowment for the Humanities (see project description).

DINAA @ SAA

The DINAA project had a very successful reception at the 79th Annual Society for American Archaeology conference in Austin, TX last month. With several presentations spanning traditional conference papers, posters, and a lightning talk at the Digital Data Interest Group meeting, conference-goers were provided with no shortage of opportunities to learn about multiple aspects of the project and its implications for the future of archaeological research. Papers: David G.

DINAA Poster Symposium Sneak Peek

Here’s the first of several posters about the DINAA project that will be presented at the SAAs this week in Austin. About the Poster: Yes, this poster is printed on fabric. With a tip from a colleague on Twitter, we discovered Spoonflower, a company that prints on fabric. What a result!! The fabric poster is on wrinkle-free material, the colors are accurate, and the printing is as sharp as if it were on paper.

Workshop Recap: State Site Files, DINAA, and Archaeology

We recently concluded a workshop for the DINAA project, held at the University of Tennessee (UT), Knoxville Office of Research on March 19th and 20th. The workshop brought together more than 30 participants, including managers and researchers from universities and state and federal agencies across Eastern North America, as well as graduate students from UT and Indiana University.

Workshop in York – 15th May 2014

We are very excited to announce that the Re-reading the British Memorial project is going north and will be holding our next workshop in York on the 15th May. The workshop will form part of a larger event called ‘Saving your Cemetery or Churchyard’ and will be held at Kings Manor (the Archaeology department of the University of York).

Publish or Perish 2014, Resurrected Online

On February 13-14, the IFHA Project at UC Davis hosted the first Innovating Communication in Scholarship (ICIS) conference. The theme this year was Publish or Perish – the Future of Academic Publishing and Careers. Open Context’s Eric Kansa attended the conference as a panelist in the session “Beyond Journals & New Forms of Digital Publishing.