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Data sharing, Page 2

Open Access: Yes the status quo really is that bad

Mitch Allen, a publisher that I greatly respect, commented on my blog posts about Aaron Swartz and scholarly communications in archaeology. His comments got me thinking again about the issue in some depth, and I want to take the opportunity to write about it in preparation for the SAA conference in Hawaii. Allen thought I was probably overstating the legal issues associated with sharing logins and sharing files to get scholarly publications.

Fred Limp (SAA President) Responding to Open Access in Archaeology

Again, thanks to everyone for the thoughtful comments and discussion on my prior post here and elsewhere. I also want to thank Fred Limp, President of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) for taking the time to share his thoughts on the topic, including posting them on this blog. Below are the comments he emailed to me (with permissions to post): Eric, Thank you for calling to my attention your thoughtful post at http://www.alexandriaarchive.

Archaeology, Open Access, and the Passing of Aaron Swartz

I don’t post to this blog as much as I used to, but every once in a while there are some developments in the world of data sharing and scholarly communications that I think worthwhile discussing with respect to archaeology. This blog post is an attempt to gather my thoughts on the issue of Open Access in advance of a forum on the subject that will be held at the Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) annual meeting in Honolulu in April.

How much of the web is archived?

Although the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine is the largest and most well-known web archive, there have been a number of public web archives that have emerged in the last several years. With varying resources, audiences and collection development policies, these archives have varying levels of overlap with each other.

New Publication on Open Access and Open Data

Eric Kansa’s hot-off-the-press paper Openness and Archaeology’s Information Ecosystem provides a timely discussion of how Open Access and Open Data models can help researchers move past some of the dysfunctions of conventional scholarly publishing. Rather than threatening quality and peer-review, these models can unlock new opportunities for finding, preserving and analyzing information that advance the discipline.

Digital Humanities Conference in Berkeley

The 2012 Pacific Neighborhood Consortium (PNC) Annual Conference and Joint Meetings will take place at School of Information at UC Berkeley from December 7th to December 9th, 2012. The conference is hosted by the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative (ECAI) and the School of Information at UC Berkeley. The main theme is New Horizons: Information Technology Connecting Culture, Community, Time, and Place. The program is packed with presentations on various digital heritage topics.

Cyberinfrastructure in Near Eastern Archaeology

At the 2012 ASOR meeting in Chicago last month, the AAI co-organized (with Chuck Jones, ISAW) and presented in the second of a 3-year session Topics in Cyberinfrastructure, Digital Humanities, and Near Eastern Archaeology I. This year’s theme was From Data to Knowledge: Organization, Publication, and Research Outcomes. Presentations and demonstrations took place two back-to-back sessions.

Open Access Week, Thoughts on Open Architectures, and a Pre-Print

In case you all didn’t know, today is the last day of 6th annual Open Access Week. I’ve been very busy lately with software updates to Open Context, an open access data publishing service for archaeology, so I haven’t had a chance to cover archaeology developments as much as I would like. However, I recently submitted a paper about open access in archaeology that was accepted to a special issue of World Archaeology.

The Red Sea Is Arabian, Erythraean, …

Place Name Clustering in Pleiades and TAVO Since September of last year, I have been working with Eric Kansa on the Gazetteer of the Ancient Near East project of the Alexandria Archive Institute (with NEH funding). Our goal is to export the cornucopia of information contained in the index of the Tübinger Atlas des Vorderen Orients (TAVO)(Tübingen Atlas of the Near and Middle East) into Pleiades, a Community-Built Gazetteer and Graph of Ancient Places.

Workshop Develops Infrastructure for Archaeology in Australia

AAI’s Technology Director Eric Kansa is currently in Sydney attending the Stocktaking Workshop of the Federated Archaeological Information Management System project (FAIMS). FAIMS launched in the summer of 2012 with a major grant from the National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources program (NeCTAR), an Australian government program to build new infrastructure for Australian researchers (working in Australia or abroad). By the end of the project (Dec.

NSF Support for Linking State Site Files

We are delighted to announce the success of our grant proposal to the National Science Foundation to create interoperability models for archaeological site databases in the eastern United States (NSF #1216810 & #1217240). Our core team consists of researchers from the Department of Anthropology and Archaeological Research Laboratory at the University of Tennessee, the Alexandria Archive Institute, and the Anthropology and Informatics programs at Indiana University.

Kenan Tepe’s Massive Dataset

We are very pleased to announce the online publication of the second installment of the Upper Tigris Archaeological Research Project’s excavation data, images, and documentation. The Upper Tigris Archaeological Research Project (UTARP), under the direction of Bradley J. Parker (University of Utah), was active in the Upper Tigris River Region of southeastern Turkey between 1998 and 2011.

A day without the Wikipedia: Protesting threats to the Open Web

If you haven’t noticed yet, the Wikipedia is blacked out, Google has blacked out its logo, and thousands of other sites are taking similar action to protest SOPA and PIPA. These bills in the House and Senate respectively threaten the open foundation of the Web, and the open dissemination of knowledge not just by the Wikipedia, but also by libraries and archives.

More Policy Threats to Open Archaeology

On the heels of SOPA, a bill that will make libraries vulnerable to lawsuits and felony charges for trying to do essential library functions (preservation and access to cultural works), comes another worrisome piece of legislation. The problematic bill is H.R. 3699, the “Research Works Act“.

Digital Archaeology and SOPA

I’m mulling over developments around the “Stop Online Piracy Act” (SOPA, warning a PDF), a new bill going through the US Congress regarding copyright and the Web. The American Library Association, Association of Research Libraries, and the Association of College and Research Libraries wrote a very alarming letter about the harmful impacts of SOPA. In case any archaeologists out there haven’t noticed, archaeological research is very dependent on libraries.