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Data preservation, Page 30

ADS Easy Workshop

Last week marked a significant milestone in the Sword-Arm project with the first demonstration of ADS Easy to a group of invited stakeholders and project partners.

Workshop Develops Infrastructure for Archaeology in Australia

AAI’s Technology Director Eric Kansa is currently in Sydney attending the Stocktaking Workshop of the Federated Archaeological Information Management System project (FAIMS). FAIMS launched in the summer of 2012 with a major grant from the National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources program (NeCTAR), an Australian government program to build new infrastructure for Australian researchers (working in Australia or abroad). By the end of the project (Dec.

NSF Support for Linking State Site Files

We are delighted to announce the success of our grant proposal to the National Science Foundation to create interoperability models for archaeological site databases in the eastern United States (NSF #1216810 & #1217240). Our core team consists of researchers from the Department of Anthropology and Archaeological Research Laboratory at the University of Tennessee, the Alexandria Archive Institute, and the Anthropology and Informatics programs at Indiana University.

Kenan Tepe’s Massive Dataset

We are very pleased to announce the online publication of the second installment of the Upper Tigris Archaeological Research Project’s excavation data, images, and documentation. The Upper Tigris Archaeological Research Project (UTARP), under the direction of Bradley J. Parker (University of Utah), was active in the Upper Tigris River Region of southeastern Turkey between 1998 and 2011.

A day without the Wikipedia: Protesting threats to the Open Web

If you haven’t noticed yet, the Wikipedia is blacked out, Google has blacked out its logo, and thousands of other sites are taking similar action to protest SOPA and PIPA. These bills in the House and Senate respectively threaten the open foundation of the Web, and the open dissemination of knowledge not just by the Wikipedia, but also by libraries and archives.

More Policy Threats to Open Archaeology

On the heels of SOPA, a bill that will make libraries vulnerable to lawsuits and felony charges for trying to do essential library functions (preservation and access to cultural works), comes another worrisome piece of legislation. The problematic bill is H.R. 3699, the “Research Works Act“.

Digital Archaeology and SOPA

I’m mulling over developments around the “Stop Online Piracy Act” (SOPA, warning a PDF), a new bill going through the US Congress regarding copyright and the Web. The American Library Association, Association of Research Libraries, and the Association of College and Research Libraries wrote a very alarming letter about the harmful impacts of SOPA. In case any archaeologists out there haven’t noticed, archaeological research is very dependent on libraries.