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Born-digital, Page 2

The oldest footprints outside of Africa: an interview with Dr. Sarah M. Duffy about the imaging of this incredible find

Sarah Duffy, PhD is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of York in the Department of Archaeology. In May of 2013, after a series of storms, ancient footprints were revealed on a beach near Happisburgh (pronounced “Hays-boro”) on Britain’s east coast in Norfolk (see a 6-minute video). The footprints were fragile and washing away a little day by day. Sarah was called to the site by Dr.

Why a Nonprofit? The Seeds of CHI

We often get asked why we set up CHI as a nonprofit. I can understand the question, because we are doing some pretty high-tech projects, and we work with a number of famous institutions whose names people recognize, perhaps making us seem grander and better endowed than we really are. There are a number of reasons why a “public benefit charity” structure made sense to Mark and me when we founded CHI in 2002. The greatest impetus for it was a personal vision we shared.

New Work in RTI: A report from recent conferences and meetings

I have had the good fortune to attend a few recent events that allowed me to see some really useful work other folks are doing in our field. I thought it worth a blog post to mention a few with some links.  I’ll note that I have seen even more cool stuff, but if there wasn’t a paper or a page I could link to, I decided not to include it here. First, Mark Mudge and I were at Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) in late April in Paris.

Behind the Scenes: Museum Photography at the Oriental Institute

Recently Anna R. Ressman, Head of Photography at the Oriental Institute Museum, University of Chicago, shared a compelling article with me, and now I’m sharing it with you. Here is a link to the Oriental Institute newsletter (PDF), which contains the article entitled, “Behind the Scenes: Museum Photography at the Oriental Institute.” Anna describes the process in which five very different artifacts are documented, each with a unique challenge.

Google Glass at Corinth

From the ASCSA website: Regular members of the ASCSA began excavation on April 7 south of the museum and Temple E with the goal to unite the conserved portions of the Frankish area with the ‘plateia’ south of the museum.  This area will be open to the public once the area is consolidated.

Greek red-figure vases, two surface examination methods and fabricated mock-ups

Paula Artal-Isbrand and Philip Klausmeyer recently published an article in the Studies in Conservation journal. Entitled “Evaluation of the relief line and the contour line on Greek red-figure vases using reflectance transformation imaging and three-dimensional laser scanning confocal microscopy,” the article examines “…the relief and contour lines on a group of ancient Greek red-figure vases and vase fragments.

CHI Welcomes Tom Malzbender to the Board of Directors!

Tom Malzbender imaging a piece from the Antikythera Mechanism We are absolutely thrilled to announce that Tom Malzbender has joined the Cultural Heritage Imaging Board of Directors! Tom is a long-time friend of CHI and has been an adviser and collaborator on many projects. Tom is best known as the co-inventor (with Dan Gelb) of Polynomial Texture Mapping (PTM) in 2001 while he was at HP Labs. PTM is the first form of Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI).

NEW: RTI glossary now available

Over the years we have received a lot of requests for a glossary of terms used in RTI, and we are happy to announce that a new “Glossary of Photographic and Technical Terms for RTI” is available on our website!  It includes photographic terms you need to know for RTI, like “Depth of Field,” “Color Temperature,” and “Aperture.

A big thank-you to our donors!

What an encouraging way to end 2013: our Annual Giving campaign raised almost twice as much as the previous year! Our donors’ continued support of Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI) is both touching to us personally and vital to our mission. Our donors’ gifts enable CHI to develop innovative digital imaging tools and practices and disseminate them to experts and students all over the world.