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James Miles

Copythorne RTI

Continuing with the results of our RTI project with the New Forest Park Authority, where we have completed a number of captures at Emery Down, Burley and Minstead, Archaeovision spent a day at St Mary’s Church in Copythorne capturing a number of gravestones. The church site dates its origin to 1834, with the first church being constructed due to the increase of inhabitants in the Parish of Eling for those who the Parish Church at Eling could not accommodate.

Myanmar (Burma) imaging

Over the next few weeks, in collaboration with SOAS University of London, the École française d’Extrême-Orient and The University of Sydney, Archaeovision will be conducting a number of different recording processes in Myanmar (Burma), including RTI, photogrammetry, high-resolution photography and multi-spectral imaging.

Minstead RTI

Continuing with the results of our RTI project with the New Forest Park Authority, where we have completed a number of captures at Emery Down and Burley, Archaeovision spent a day at All Saints Church in Minstead capturing gravestones, as well as the church’s 12th century font. The church is made famous for being the last resting place of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who was buried in the cemetery in 1955, but dates its origins to the 13th century.

City of London Guildhall UAV Photogrammetry Survey

During the summer, Archaeovision took part in the UAV photogrammetry survey of the Grade I listed Guildhall building in the City of London. The purpose of the survey was to produce a condition survey report of the ceremonial and administrative centre of the City of London and its Corporation. The construction of the Guildhall began in 1411 and was completed in 1440, and remains the only non-ecclesiastical stone building in the City to have survived through to the present day.

Burley RTI

As a continuation of our RTI project with the New Forest Park Authority, where we have completed a number of captures at Emery Down, Archaeovision spent a day at St John Baptist Church in Burley, capturing further gravestones for the Heritage Lottery funded Our Past, Our Future project. Our involvement within this overall project incorporates community based outreach within the their Rediscovering and Conserving Our Archaeological Heritage sub-project.

Emery Down RTI

Under the New Forest National Park Authority’s landscape scheme, Our Past, Our Future, which is supported by Heritage Lottery funding, Archaeovision took part in one of the first community days for their Rediscovering and Conserving Our Archaeological Heritage project. Under their landscape scheme, 21 projects will be delivered across four themes of work, which aim to better equip the New Forest to thrive through change and modern-day pressures.

Bradley Manor Update

Work on this interesting project for the National Trust has now been completed. The project involved a detailed laser scan of Bradley Manor and the attached Poundhouse. In total, 55 scans were used to record the external features of Bradley Manor using a Faro Focus x130; 47 scans were captured for the internal and external features of Poundhouse. The Faro scanner was used due to its quick capture rate and integrated GPS.

North Boscaswell Mine

Earlier this year Archaeovision completed a landscape photogrammetry survey of North Boscaswell Mine, Pendeen, Cornwall for the National Trust. North Boscaswell Mine worked for little more than a decade from 1906 and incorporates the remains of the only known Merton Furnace to survive in Britain. The mine was small-scale with 11 men being employed underground and six at surface in 1906. The numbers rose steadily until 1909 when the total number of employees was 41.

The Ethics of Dust: Westminster Hall

Last year Archaeovision were contacted by Artangel in regard to their Ethics of Dust project. The Ethics of Dust is a major temporary site-specific artwork of Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the Houses of Parliament, home of the UK’s House of Commons and House of Lords. A 50 metre long translucent latex cast of the hall’s internal and external east wall were recorded, containing hundreds of years of surface pollution and dust.

East Anglian Archaeology Reports

Archaeovision were approached by East Anglian Archaeology to explore the provision of online access to their back catalogue of monographs. This would involve the construction of a repository where all past issues of EAA would be described, made searchable, and where stock is still available, provide links to buy copies. Older back issues would be scanned and made available as an open access PDF.

CAA-UK

As computational archaeologist, CAA (Computer Applications and Quantitative methods in archaeology) plays an important part in the work that Archaeovision completes. CAA is an international led conference package that meets once a year in different countries in order to increase participation from archaeologist, computer scientists and mathematicians all over the world. This year’s conference will meet in Oslo, Norway and the following year the conference will be held in Atlanta, USA.

Bradley Manor

Work began two weeks ago on the documentation of Bradley Manor for the National Trust. Bradley Manor is one of the most complete medieval manor houses in Devon and can be found on the outskirts of Newton Abbot. The house is Grade I listed, and with its associated buildings, structures and landscape, has been identified as being in need of archaeological assessment and survey for a forthcoming Conservation Management Plan.

RTI Capture of a 12th century Cambodian Stela

As part of our ongoing collaboration with the École française d’Extrême-Orient (EFEO), which is a French institute dedicated to the study of Asian societies, Archaeovision were employed to capture an important 12th century Cambodian stela through RTI. The stela is an important piece of Cambodian history as it shows the only known example of the inscription work completed by the scribe but there remains some areas within the inscriptions that are hard to identify and translate.

Deerhurst Photogrammetry Project

Work began in March in the digitisation of the South Cloister Wall at St Mary’s Priory Church in Deerhurst, Gloucestershire. The church dates it’s origins back to 804AD when Æthelric, son of  Æthelmund, bequeathed extensive lands to the community at Deerhurst with the 9th century seeing Deerhurst as being one of the most important religious foundations of the kingdom of the Hwicce, a sub-kingdom of Mercia.

Update on the Insula Dell’ara Coeli

In August of last year we published a post on the laser scanning work that we completed in June of 2014 of the Insula Dell’ara Coeli based at the foot of the Capitoline Hill in Rome. Work has been ongoing since then and we are now in a position to release an animation of the laser scan model recorded. We are unable to show the high resolution images of the data as it is still under examination by Dr. Elisabetta Bianchi from the Sovraintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali and Dr.

The Ice House at Beaulieu

As a Grade ll listed structure, the Ice House at the Beaulieu estate in the New forest, Hampshire is thought to date back to the early to mid part of the 19th century. It is of a brick construction that comprises a two meter long and two meter high vaulted passage that has the remains of an outer door and indications of at least two inner doors. The Ice House entrance leads to a domed structure that is of a three and half meter diameter with a three meter deep storage chamber.

Agisoft PhotoScan Reseller

Archaeovision is a technology and software driven company. In order to succeed as a business we have spent many hours learning and testing a number of different software packages to provide the best service possible to our clients. Our extensive knowledge of how individual software packages work sets us apart from the rest as it allows our clients more freedom in the decision that they make.

Imaging session at CAA

The CAA conference is the largest international archaeological computing conference and is regularly attending by the leading experts in our chosen fields of study. Every year the location changes with recent conferences being in Southampton, Perth, Australia and Paris. In the past Archaeovision members James, Hembo, Paul, Tom and Kaarel have all given papers and some of us have hosted sessions on various topics.

Ancient Impossible

Last night in the USA a program called Ancient Impossible: Extreme Engineering aired on the History channel. The series focusses on how today’s technological achievements were developed centuries ago. This episode looks at specific examples of ancient structures and how past civilisations were able to to create new engineering feats to counter the obstacles that stood in their way.