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Graeme Earl

Annotating RTI data in 3d and 2d

I’ve been talking to a lot people in recent months about annotation frameworks for RTI and today’s introduction to the #rodeimagingevent (see Hembo’s blog post) has crystalised some of these. I was talking to @kathrynpiquette about annotation and I also tweeted a query to @iipimage about it. @portableant suggested annotorious (something that I know our current MSc student Vassilis Valergas has been examining) and also openCanvas was suggested.

Burying the Digital

Clay tablet (wikipedia) I am at Museums and the Web this week in Baltimore. I was sat next to @trinkermedia and we were talking enthusiastically about  the physical, tangible and the interactive digital (as usual). Over the last few years we have been digitising very large collections of cuneiform tablets and are mid way through developing an open source Reflectance Transformation Imaging web renderer that will allow interaction with these on mobile devices and desktops.

Portus lecture tweets

I have posted a storify pulling together some of the tweets from Simon Keay’s lecture “From Trajan to Belisarius”. This included an introduction to the proposed Portus MOOC which we hope to launch in 2014.

Symposium at Rochester: Contemporary Themes in 3D Archaeological Computing

I am going to be speaking on December 4th 2013 at a symposium on 3d digital archaeology. The symposium, organised by Renato Perucchi and Elizabeth Colantoni at the University of Rochester, will discuss state-of-the-art multidisciplinary issues bridging the humanities and the applied sciences related to 3D modeling, visualization, and analysis including engineering evaluations of complex archaeological structures and data.

ACRG member moves to University of York

Gareth digging at Basing House, Summer 2013. ACRG member, Gareth Beale, has been appointed as Research Fellow at the University of York. Gareth will be based at the Centre for Digital Heritage. In his post as Research Fellow, Gareth will manage and share the coordination of a new international collaboration in Digital Heritage between the Universities of York, Aarhus, Leiden and Uppsala.

#CAAPerth Day Four

<Live blog> 11:38 Interesting to get statistics on usage in the field next season – can get at issues then of serendipitous discovery perhaps. Also discussion of potential impact (good and bad) on evolving archaeology on the site of accessing information before it has been in some way checked or otherwise curated. Also is the immediacy of connection between the field and the spceialists. This relates to ongoing work on fieldwork ethnographies as part of the RCUK Patina Project.

#CAAPerth Day Three

I am jumping between sessions today. <live blog> 10:46 Off to chair session S30 – Computational approaches towards artefacts studies (on behalf of Eleni Kotoula). Session starting at 11:00. 10:45 Examining spatial relationships along the street front. 10:42 Explored overlapping isovists to explore movement around the city, and visual overlaps in order to create visibility connections.

#CAAPerth Day Two – S1 – 3D recording, data capture and visualisation technologies for Rock Art

Chair(s): Geoff Avern, Jo McDonald Discussant(s): Geoff Avern, Jo McDonald Format: Long Paper Presentation with Roundtable Schedule: Tuesday 26th 10:30 – 15:00 Room: Auditorium Venue: University of Western Australia Club Details from: http://caa2013.org/drupal/sessions <live blog below> 12:35 Finished for lunch. 12:30 Q&A: noting that more data is not necessarily a good thing. You can end up with problems due to multiple errors.

#CAAPerth Day Two – opening and first keynote

Day two at @CAAPerth started with an introduction to the conference by Gary Lock. He thanked in particular Arianna Traviglia who brought this week’s events to fruition. Thanks Arianna! Gary noted that c. 250 had made it to CAA this year – the 41st year CAA has run – with at least 100 from Australia, representing another increase in CAA#s audience. Gary also noted the Nick Ryan bursary which is for current students.

#CAAPerth

Members of the ACRG are out in force at this year’s Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) conference at the University of Western Australia, Perth. Today there were workshops on complex systems simulation and reflectance transformation imaging organised by Tom Brughmans and Iza Romanowska, and by James Miles and Hembo Pagi.

#bttowerview

I love this digital stuff. Following a tweet and some exchanges of emails the inimitable @cgutteridge has created a great mashup of the BT tower view panorama, wikipedia (including use of RDF) and lat long locations e.g. from google maps. Have a look at the BTtowerview mashup. It would be great to identify some archaeological and architectural history locations as RDF to feed into the view. Has anyone hacked a way of turning a long lat location to #bttowerview bookmark? e.g. btlondon2012.co.

Reconstructing Portus – Rome’s Lost Empire

Why produce computer models? We have been producing computer graphic representations as part of our work at Portus since 2007. These are used for a number of purposes. Firstly, they help us to bring together all the many forms of digital data gathered on site, through survey, geophysics, photogrammetry, laser scanning and other tools. For example, we are combining three-dimensional geophysics with laser scans and excavated sections to understand the development of the Building 5.

AHRC RTISAD project legacy – 18 months

Another six months have passed, and we have been as busy as ever using the RTISAD equipment and expertise. Dissemination In October Nicole Beale demonstrated Highlight Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) at the Insight from Innovation conference, a three day archaeological ceramics event hosted by the Ceramics Research Group. More details on this blog post. In July Hembo Pagi and Eleonora Gandolfi gave a small presentation about ACRG at the Archaeology department in Perth, Australia.

Microsoft Research and UC Berkeley Collaboration – Portus Chronozoom

We have been working with colleagues in Microsoft Research and at UC Berkeley to create Chronozoom timelines that describe Roman archaeology, with a view to populating a timeline for the Roman world in due course. Our first pilot has been at Portus, where we have charted the creation and eventual abandonment of the site. We have only just started to develop the Portus Chronozoom and there is much more multimedia content to add but please do have a look, and at the wider Chronozoom project.

Portus lecture live stream

This page will contain the live feed of the lecture by the director of the Portus Project Professor Simon Keay given on 9 October 2012 at 6pm UTC. If you would like to tweet questions to Professor Simon Keay send them to @ArchCRG and include #portusproject. Tweet !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js”;fjs.parentNode.

CGI research at Portus

The AHRC Portus Project is partly focussed on the application and evaluation of digital technologies, and in particular the production of computer graphic models. Specifically we implement Computer Graphic Imagery following geophysical assessment, during the excavation, in the analysis of excavated and surveyed archaeology, and in the representation and debate of interpretations.