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Doug Rocks-Macqueen, Page 2

Across the Atlantic: professionalism in archaeology over here and over there

A new trend in archaeology conferences is to run the say session in different conferences/countries or to have organisations run sessions in other organisations. I whole hearty approve of such innovation.  As it is Wednesday, so conference video time, I though I would share one of these cross-country sessions from the CIfA conference. SESSION ABSTRACT This session aims to compare regulatory procedures and the role of professional standards and professional accreditation in the USA and the UK.

Archaeology, education and young people

Children and retired people are the bread and butter of public engagement. So it is not surprising to have seen a session at the CIfA conference on the topic but what was interesting to see was a session that moved into the realm of social issues with children. There are lots of kids based projects and lots of social projects but the intersection of the two is rarer.

Visualizing the Past. Exploring Meaningful Approaches in Interpreting the Archaeological Record Through Illustrations and Reconstructions

‘Creating really memorable images’. That is something that every artist, graphic designer and illustrator struggles with. Now toss in trying to create memorable images of the past with limited data and it is a job I do not envy. Or do I have it wrong? Do we have too much data to make memorable images? That was the discussion in this session from the EAA conference, that we video recorded so you can watch the presentations and see for yourself.

The Future of Community Archaeology

There are hundreds of community excavations, surveys and general investigations into the past that take place every year. And that is in the UK alone. But what happens to all that work? Do people just have a nice play, ruin some perfectly good archaeology and take food out of the mouths of professional archaeologist? I am paraphrasing a bit here but that statement is what I have been told by several ‘Professional’ archaeologists.

Local Perspectives on Archaeology from Around the World

We tend to dig other people’s pasts, even in our own countries, such is the nature of archaeology. One of the great joys of archaeology is listening to local communities and their impressions of the past. So it was a real pleasure to listen to some archaeologists and non-archaeologists discuss archaeology and their past from around the world at WAC-8. I recorded the talks which you can see below.

World Archaeological Congress at 30

A boycott of archaeologists! Literally, the World Archaeological Congress, the major organisation for bringing archaeologists together, was created out of an act of exclude other archaeologists. Here is brief excerpt of the history of WAC from Joan Gero that explains it: “An international forum for archaeological research was first organized in 1931 with the founding of the International Union of Pre- and Proto-Historic Sciences (IUPPS).

World Archaeological Congress at 30

A boycott of archaeologists! Literally, the World Archaeological Congress, the major organisation for bringing archaeologists together, was created out of an act of exclude other archaeologists. Here is brief excerpt of the history of WAC from Joan Gero that explains it: “An international forum for archaeological research was first organized in 1931 with the founding of the International Union of Pre- and Proto-Historic Sciences (IUPPS).

The skills gap: training for competence in archaeology

Its Wednesday, which means conference video day. This week the videos are from the CIfA conference. SESSION ABSTRACT: Diggers Forum (DF) takes forward the proposal that the level of competence of every professional archaeologist shall be Practitioner or above: any archaeologist in the profession who is not working at PCIfA level competence must be working within a structured training programme provided by their employer to take them to at least PCIfA level competence.

EAC Heritage Management Symposium Digital Archaeological Heritage- Part 2

Digital tools- how do they change how we manage heritage and archaeology? Last week I posted the first half of the EAC Heritage Management Symposium and here is the second half of those presentations: Saving Treasures: The DANS digital archive https://youtu.be/Jkx5aGMoyeY DANS, the Dutch national digital research archive, is an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) http://dans.knaw.nl/.

Can you model that? Applications of complex systems simulation to explore the past

It’s Wednesday which means conference video day. Session Abstract Iza Romanowska, Stefani Crabtree, Benjamin Davies The large scale patterns that we commonly detect in the archaeological record are often not a simple sum of individual human interactions. Instead, they are a complex interwoven network of dependencies among individuals, groups, and the environment in which individuals live.

EAC Heritage Management Symposium Digital Archaeological Heritage- Part 1

‘Digital technologies are developing at an unprecedented speed. As they do, they are opening up many new possibilities for the conduct and presentation of archaeological research and investigation. The digital realm is one which knows few borders and so the sharing of understanding about these new methods, techniques and possibilities across Europe is extremely valuable.’ That was the opening call to the 17th Europae Archaeologiae Consilium symposium.

Digital rock art documentations, new perceptions

Its the weekly conference video post. If you want to see archaeology conference presentations then stop by this blog every Wednesday. Session Abstract: David Vogt, Steinar Kristensen, Magne Samdal, Bjarte Aarseth The documentation of rock art has a tradition that spans over one hundred years, during which several methods have been tried and tested. Today, the traditional tracing method is the most commonly used all over the world.

Needles in the haystack: Geophysical methods in challenging conditions

Your weekly conference videos. Check in every Wednesday to see some great presentations on many different topics: Session abstract Lars Gustavsen, Christer Tonning, Arne Anderson Stamnes, Erich Nau, Monica Kristiansen The development of geophysical techniques for archaeological purposes has largely taken place in areas where archaeological features tend to be pronounced, well-defined and, arguably, easily detected by geophysical instruments.

Networking the past: Towards best practice in archaeological network science

Wednesday, so the weekly conference videos. Session Abstract: Tom Brughmans, Daniel Weidele The full diversity of network perspectives has only been introduced in our discipline relatively recently. As a result we are still in the long-term process of evaluating which theories and methods are available, the ‘fit’ between particular network perspectives and particular research questions, and how to apply these critically.

Theorising the Digital: Digital Theoretical Archaeology Group (digiTAG) and the CAA

It’s Wednesday, which means the weekly post of conference videos. This week’s is an interesting mix of the TAG and CAA conference i.e. they brought TAG to CAA. Session Abstract: James Stuart Taylor, Sara Perry, Nicolò Del’Unto, Åsa Berggren Computing and the application of new digital technologies in archaeology and the heritage sector more generally have been advancing rapidly in recent years.

Public archaeology and the use of digital platforms

Every Wednesday I post new videos from conferences I have recorded… and today is no different. This weeks videos: Session Abstract: Ingvild Solberg Andreassen The past decade or so has seen a great increase the in digitalization of archaeological materials. More data than ever before is being collected in the field. Archaeologists are online while excavating, blogging and tweeting, and all projects now have a Facebook page.