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Bill Caraher

On Academia.edu

Yesterday Sarah Bond published a thoughtful, short article in her regular Forbes column suggesting that academics abandon Academia.edu and move their research to open access alternatives. Bond argues that academia.edu is a for-profit wolf in .edu-sheep clothing. It’s not a real .edu, in that it’s not in institution of higher learning (which is the current criteria for an organization to use the “.edu” domain name).

Revenge of the Analog

Over the holiday break, I read David Sax’s Revenge of the Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter (Public Affairs 2016). It’s a popular book and Sax is a journalist who write on culture and technologies for a range of periodicals.

Revenge of the Analog

Over the holiday break, I read David Sax’s Revenge of the Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter (Public Affairs 2016). It’s a popular book and Sax is a journalist who write on culture and technologies for a range of periodicals.

Revenge of the Analog

Over the holiday break, I read David Sax’s Revenge of the Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter (Public Affairs 2016). It’s a popular book and Sax is a journalist who write on culture and technologies for a range of periodicals.

Mobility and Archaeology

As I read Tim Cresswell’s 2006 book on mobility: Tim Cresswell’s On the Move: Mobility in the Modern Western World (Routledge 2006), I couldn’t help but think of Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future, the most recent book published by the Digital Press at the University of North Dakota.   The idea conveyed by the title, Mobilizing the Past, is that by using mobile devices from iPads to phones to drones and digital cameras allows the past to become mobile. This is a significant idea.

ASOR Wrap Up

My apologies for missing a few days on the old blog last week, but I was pretty busy at the annual meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research. Unfortunately, I was not able to make it to as many panels as I would have liked, but it was a productive meeting none the less. So here are five things that happened (to me; after all, it’s my blog!) at ASOR: 1. Object Biography.

Archaeology Mediated by Technology: Gibson, Dick, and Archaeologies of the Future

Last week, I posted a draft of my ASOR paper, and today it is more or less done. It think I originally titled the paper “Excavating in the 21st Century: A Fictional Biography Mediated by Technology,” mostly because it rhymed.  Enjoy. For my brief remarks today I’m intentionally misunderstanding the assignment for this panel. Rather than discuss the artifacts presented in the pdf file that Rick and Nancy circulated, I want to consider the pdf document as an archaeological artifact.

Almost Done: Mobilizing the Past and the Stack Test

I have something like 12 changes to make to the Digital Press at the University of North Dakota’s next book, Mobilizing the Past, before it can go live in both digital and paper formats. Most of these changes involve little cosmetic fixes within the book and the addition of the book’s freshly minted LCCN (2016917316 for those of you keeping track at home!). The most important test though for a book, is the shelf or stack test.

Future of Archaeologies

Next month, I’m slated to give a crazy paper at the American Schools of Oriental Research annual meeting. My paper imagines archaeology in a near future where drones, autonomous robots, and 3D scanning technologies make it possible to systematically document sites remotely and to relay the results to archaeologists aboard a repurposed Russian Ekranoplan. Fortunately, the paper only needs to be 5 minutes long.

Learning Lessons from Publishing

I’m almost done with another book from The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota, and this book has been exponentially more complex and time consuming than the previous titles. Some of it has to do with length. Mobilizing the Past runs to over 550 type-set pages making it a third longer than any previous book. Some of it has to do with the number of moving parts. Go download the introduction and check out the table of contents now.

Mobilizing the Past: The Blurb for the Book

I’m pretty excited that Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future is almost ready and will appear next month from The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota. We’re sorting through some last minute edits, getting the online component finalized, and starting to spread the word. As part of that, do check out the book blurb and the table of contents below the cover.

Data, Digital Archaeology, and Publishing

To short things this morning related to digital archaeology.  First, abstracts were due last night for the Society of American Archaeology Annual Meeting next spring, so there was the predictable flurry of activity. I generally don’t do much with the SAA conference, but this year there was some interest in a panel on digital archaeology, I’ll contribute to a paper with Erin Walcek Averett, Derek Counts, and Jody Gordon.

Satellite Remote Sensing in the AJA

I have to admit to being equal parts geeked out and creeped out by recent advances in satellite (or, more broadly, aerial) remote sensing in archaeology. I am excited as anyone to read about the latest “lost city” to appear from the use of LiDAR in the jungle and recognize that ever increasingly resolutions of multi-spectral satellite images provides new ways for archaeologists to tease out subsurface features from subtle variations in vegetation, soil color, and even elevation.

Cover Options for Mobilizing the Past

I’ve spend a good bit of time this July laying out the next book from The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota. Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future: The Potential of Digital Archaeology edited by Erin Walcek Averett, Jody Michael Gordon, and Derek Counts will represent both state of the field survey on digital tools and techniques in archaeological fieldwork, but also offer critical perspectives on these tools and methods.

Track Changes

Anyone interested in the impact of technology on our work as scholars and writers should read Matthew Kirschenbaum’s Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing (2016), and check out some supplemental material here. The book is not only entertaining to read, but it intersects with so many of the key issues facing our engagement with technology today, that it may well spawn hundreds of master’s theses and not a few dissertations.

The Digital Press is Mobilizing the Past

Over the last six months, The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota has been collaborating with a remarkable group of authors, editors, and reviewers to produce an edited volume from an NEH funded conference called Mobilizing the Past for a Digital Future: The Potential of Digital Archaeology held last February in Boston. It was a good conference with good conversations among the participants.

Digital Humanities and the New Liberal Arts

In a productive coincidence, there was a provocative published in the Los Angeles Review of Books that subjected the Digital Humanities to rather pointed criticism aligning the darling of tech-savvy humanists, granting agencies, and university administrators everywhere with the dreaded neoliberal bugbear of our age.

Speed and Digital Archaeology

A few weeks ago, I was invited to contribute something to a panel called “Just Google It: Archaeology, Pop-Culture, and Digital Media.” I wrote this abstract. Now I have to work on the paper. I don’t think that this is much of an introduction, but some of the ideas that I want to build into my paper.  Enjoy. Or not.

Enlinkening an AJA Review Essay

Just for fun, I took my very recent review essay in the American Journal of Archaeology and added a bunch of links. Some are just to Worldcat, but some of these, marked by little plus signs (+) offer linked to addition content including blog posts, podcasts, and reviews. Where possible I’ve linked to copies of the essays or related content.